Posted 10 hours ago
Petition to stop calling it homosexual, bisexual, pansexual, etc. and call it homosexy, bisexy, and pansexy ‘cause queers are hella sexy.
Kristen Guin, founder of Queerability, via Twitter.
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Queerability Features TASH for Autism Acceptance Month!

Last week, we examined multiple perspectives about why Autism Speaks is problematic and hurtful for autistic people. With that in mind this week, let us take a look at some great organizations that do positive work for the autistic community and are worthy of support! 

The criteria in which we judged an autism-related organization are as follows:

  • Meaningfully includes people on the autism spectrum in top levels of leadership.
  • Affirms the lives of autistic people.
  • Strives towards full inclusion of autistic people in the community. 
  • Financially responsible. 
  • Accepting of LGBTQ people. 

Today’s feature organization is TASH

This is TASH’s Mission Statement

As a leader in disability advocacy for more than 35 years, the mission of TASH is to promote the full inclusion and participation of children and adults with significant disabilities in every aspect of their community, and to eliminate the social injustices that diminish human rights. These things are accomplished through collaboration among self-advocates, families, professionals, policy-makers, advocates and many others who seek to promote equity, opportunity and inclusion. Together, this mission is realized through:

Advocacy for equity, opportunities, social justice and human rights

Education of the public, government officials, community leaders and service providers

Research that translates excellence to practice

Individualized, quality supports in place of congregate and segregated settings and services

Legislation, litigation and public policy consistent with the mission and vision of TASH

The focus of TASH is supporting those people with significant disabilities and support needs who are most at risk for being excluded from society; perceived by traditional service systems as most challenging; most likely to have their rights abridged; most likely to be at risk for living, working, playing and learning in segregated environments; least likely to have the tools and opportunities necessary to advocate on their behalf; and are most likely to need ongoing, individualized supports to participate in inclusive communities and enjoy a quality of life similar to that available to all people.

TASH is accepting of LGBTQ people. 

To donate to TASH click here.

Follow TASH’s social media:

Posted 5 days ago

Queerability Features the Autism Society of America for Autism Acceptance Month!

Last week, we examined multiple perspectives about why Autism Speaks is problematic and hurtful for autistic people. With that in mind this week, let us take a look at some great organizations that do positive work for the autistic community and are worthy of support! 

The criteria in which we judged an autism-related organization are as follows:

  • Meaningfully includes people on the autism spectrum in top levels of leadership.
  • Affirms the lives of autistic people.
  • Strives towards full inclusion of autistic people in the community. 
  • Financially responsible. 
  • Accepting of LGBTQ people. 

Today’s feature organization is the Autism Society of America

This is the ASA’s Mission and Vision

Our Mission

Improving the lives of all affected by autism

Our Vision

The Autism Society is the leading voice and resource of the entire autism community in education, advocacy, services, research and support. The Autism Society is committed to meaningful participation and self-determination in all aspects of life for individuals on the autism spectrum and their families. The Autism Society accomplishes its ongoing mission through close collaboration with a successful network of affiliates, members and supporters.

The ASA is accepting of LGBTQ people. 

To donate to the ASA click here.

Follow the ASA’s social media:

Posted 6 days ago

Queerability, with guest Kristen Guin

Thanks to Sharon da Vanport of autisticwomen for having Kristen Guin on AWN’s radio show! Listen to the radio show here!

Posted 6 days ago

Queerability Features the Global and Regional Aspergers Syndrome Partnership for Autism Acceptance Month!

Last week, we examined multiple perspectives about why Autism Speaks is problematic and hurtful for autistic people. With that in mind this week, let us take a look at some great organizations that do positive work for the autistic community and are worthy of support! 

The criteria in which we judged an autism-related organization are as follows:

  • Meaningfully includes people on the autism spectrum in top levels of leadership.
  • Affirms the lives of autistic people.
  • Strives towards full inclusion of autistic people in the community. 
  • Financially responsible. 
  • Accepting of LGBTQ people. 

Today’s feature organization is the Global Regional Asperger Syndrome Partnership

This is GRASP’s Mission Statement

GRASP’s Mission:

GRASP’s mission is to improve and enrich the lives of adolescents and adults on the autism spectrum, and their families through, community advocacy & outreach, education, peer supports, programming and services, at no cost to its members.

GRASP’s Vision:

At GRASP, we envision a world where all individuals on the autism spectrum are respected, valued, and fairly represented, where appropriate supports and services are readily available to those in need, where people on the spectrum are empowered to participate in personal decisions that affect their lives.

GRASP’s Approach:

Committed to meeting the needs of adults and teens on the autism spectrum …
With an emphasis on community outreach and individuals advocating for their own needs, GRASP’s by-laws stipulate that the Executive Director, 100% of the Advisory Board, and 50% of the Board of Directors of GRASP must be people who are diagnosed on the autism spectrum.

Speaking up for individuals on the spectrum …
On a national level, GRASP speaks up to make sure the views of adults and teens on the autism spectrum are represented in the media and in public policy. On the local level, GRASP advocates for the needs of individuals in order to increase their level of independence, social community, quality of support systems, and personal understanding.

A network of support …
Through a network of regional peer-run support groups and online discussion groups, GRASP helps adults and teens across the country. GRASP also offers support to family members and clinicians, through in-person and online discussion groups.  In addition, we provide programs specific to increasing socialization, daily living skills, employment, and self-advocacy.

Reaching students in need …
GRASP’s in-school programs offer schools a highly effective way to help students on the autism spectrum learn advocacy skills, social ability, and gain self-esteem.

Educating the larger community …
GRASP helps educate the public and raise awareness by delivering presentations and workshops developed and run by adults and teens on the autism spectrum. GRASP also maintains a website with a library of free online resources.

GRASP is accepting of LGBTQ people. 

To donate to GRASP click here.

Follow GRASP’s social media:

Posted 6 days ago

Queerability, with guest Kristen Guin